Working-Class Anglicans: Religion and Identity in Victorian and Edwardian Hamilton, Ontario

Authors

  • Edward Smith

Abstract

St. Luke's Anglican Church came into being in Hamilton's north-end in the summer of 1882, as Hamilton's working class was entering the second phase of Canadian industrialization. Urban geography, class, and ethnicity were factors in the establishment of the parish in this singularly working-class district of the city, which included a high proportion of immigrants. Into the mix were also thrown differing conceptions of Anglican parishes held by clergy and laity. For the congregation of St. Luke's, a local parish church became important to creating an identity separate from older, more established congregations dominated by elite Canadian Anglicans.

Downloads

Published

01.05.2003

Issue

Section

Articles